PRESS REVIEW – 12 SEPTEMBER 2018

1- OUR MEMBERS TALKED TO US ABOUT EVENTS…

  • End of Summer Impact Investing Pitch Evening: ClearlySo is organizing in London on September 18  this impact investing pitch exclusively for high-net-worth individuals. ClearlySo will talk about impact investing, then 3 innovative founders seekings funds will pitch and finally, participants will be able to network during a cocktail.

Click here to learn more about the event and register: EventBrite.co.uk.

One of our members wil be attending.

E-mail solene@monaco-impact.org if you wish to be put in contact with him.

 

 

SHARE ALSO WITH US ARTICLES, EVENTS AND POSTS

♦ SOLENE@MONACO-IMPACT.ORG ♦

 

2- OUR MEMBERS TALKED TO US ABOUT REPORTS

“PHILANTHROPY TRANSFORMING FINANCE: BUILDING AN IMPACT ECONOMY”

For full article and request the report: ImpactAlchemist.com

Impact Entrepreneur Center and Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors have produced a report on their recent international leadership summit, Philanthropy Transforming Finance: Building an Impact Economy. The summit drew four dozen individuals from three continents who are leaders across the themes of systems thinking, philanthropy, impact investing and “new economy” models.

Co-leads for the summit and report, Rockefeller’s Heather Grady and Impact Entrepreneur’s Laurie Lane-Zucker, framed the report in these terms:

Many organizations today are helping to solve seemingly intractable problems, and demonstrating the possibility of moving beyond incremental change to real transformation. But their success rests in their ability to shift the complex systems in which those problems exist—and that is influenced by many factors, not least how they are funded, the strength and efficacy of their networks, and whether collectively organizations are intervening in different ways that together add up to a meaningful transition to a new status quo. On the funding side, to date, the contributions that financial capital is making to anything more than
incremental change is limited. Viewed and deployed using a wider, systemic perspective, with a more ambitious and courageous agenda, and with an emphasis on transformation, the philanthropy and impact investing sectors’ resources can do much more to build an impact economy.

In our days together, the summit participants explored the challenges facing us and developed plans for collaborative action to encourage and expand investment into our collective vision for the future. We mapped, analyzed and made progress on the path to creating an impact economy that delivers on critical agendas. This report details much of that work.

 

In keeping with the report’s title, a main call to action from the summit was specifically aimed at philanthropic organizations to:

1) use their capital in a manner more directly supporting the investments described in this report

2) align their investments and actions overall with the underlying values inherent in an impact economy.

Key elements of a manifesto were discussed as a roadmap for philanthropic organizations to use in understanding how to get involved in this process.

 

The participants challenged philanthropists and philanthropic organizations to:

  • Commit a minimum of 1% of total assets (grants and investments) towards building the coordinated infrastructure, scaffolding and architecture of the impact economy.
  • Use an integrated finance model via grants or social impact investing, among other mechanisms, to expend the capital raised.
  • Support and follow a roadmap of how to deploy philanthropic dollars, including de-risking investment, thought leadership, education and training, policy and infrastructure, internal talent and culture, data and industry mapping, and building a pre-investment pipeline of early stage social enterprises.
  • Use donor advised funds as a source of capital for these efforts.
  • Supply more risk-tolerant funding for early stage initiatives, and embrace a spirit of experimentation and innovation. The institutions and individuals in philanthropy should become more entrepreneurial, which constitutes a radical change in the culture of many organizations and individuals in the sector.

 

3- OUR MEMBERS TALKED TO US ABOUT ARTICLES

“A QUICK GUIDE TO SOCIAL CHANGE BUZZWORDS AND TERMINOLOGY”

For full article: SocialChangeCentral.com

Social Impact, Intrapreneurship, Benefit Corporation, Shared Value — there are a lot of buzzwords that get thrown around in the social arena. It is important to understand what these terms mean and when to use them – or when not to use them. Here is a quick guide to help you get to grips with all the jargon and fanfare that surround social change. Whether you add them to your lexicon or boycott them is up to you, just make sure you know what they mean.

 


 

BENEFIT CORPORATION
A type of corporation, currently recognised in 30 U.S. states and D.C. with legally protected requirements of higher purpose, accountability, and transparency.

BLENDED VALUE
The delivery of both a social or environmental return and a financial return. It’s a win-win that does not require compromise on either side of the social or financial equation.

CERTIFIED B CORP
For-profit companies certified by the nonprofit B Lab to meet rigorous standards of social and environmental performance, accountability, and transparency.

CHANGEMAKER
A term coined by the social entrepreneurship organisation, Ashoka, meaning one who desires change in the world and, by gathering knowledge and resources, makes that change happen.

COLLECTIVE IMPACT
Collective impact occurs when organisations from different sectors agree to solve a specific social problem using a common agenda, aligning their efforts, and using common measures of success.

CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
The continuing commitment by business to contribute to economic development while improving the quality of life of the workforce and their families as well as of the community and society at large.

DESIGN THINKING
A distinctive process of developing innovative solutions that is rooted in principles of physical, spatial, graphic, and user-interface design. It is characterized by an emphasis on deeply understanding the practical needs, behavior, and perspectives of actual users and constituents and may be applied to a wide variety of challenges, including programs, services, products, and processes. It is an action-oriented approach to generating creative solutions to complex problems.

EFFECTIVE ALTRUISM
A philosophy and social movement which applies evidence and reason to working out the most effective ways to improve the world. It is built upon a simple but profound idea: that living a fully ethical life means using your spare resources for the “most good you can do”.

GREENWASHING
Used to describe the act of misleading consumers regarding the environmental practices of a company or the environmental benefits of a product or service.

IMPACT INVESTING
Investment with the intention to achieve both a positive social, cultural or environmental benefit and some measure of financial return.

SHARED VALUE
A set of corporate policies and practices that enhance the competitiveness of a company, simultaneously advancing social and economic conditions.

SOCIAL CAPITAL
The institutions, relationships, and norms that shape the quality and quantity of a society’s social interactions. Increasing evidence shows that social cohesion is critical for societies to prosper economically and for development to be sustainable. Social capital is not just the sum of the institutions which underpin a society – it is the glue that holds them together.

SOCIAL ENTREPRENEUR
Social entrepreneurs drive social innovation and transformation in various fields including education, health, environment and enterprise development. They pursue poverty alleviation goals with entrepreneurial zeal, business methods and the courage to innovate and overcome traditional practices. A social entrepreneur, similar to a business entrepreneur, builds strong and sustainable organisations, which are either set up as not-for-profits or companies.

SOCIAL ENTERPRISE 
An organisation that applies commercial strategies to maximise social impact rather than profits.

SOCIAL IMPACT
All forms of significant change experienced by individuals and communities. This includes income and labour market impacts, education impacts, social inclusion and relationship changes, mental and physical health effects, and overall impact on quality of life and well-being.

SOCIAL INNOVATION
A novel solution to a social problem that is more effective, efficient, sustainable, or just than current solutions. The value created accrues primarily to society rather than to private individuals.

SOCIAL INTRAPRENEURSHIP
People within a large corporation who take direct initiative for innovations that address social or environmental challenges while also creating commercial value for the company.

SOCIAL RETURN ON INVESTMENT (SROI)
A form of stakeholder-driven evaluation blended with cost-benefit analysis tailored to social purposes. It tells the story of how change is being created and places a monetary value on that change and compares it with the costs of inputs required to achieve it.

SYSTEMS THINKING
The ability to understand interconnections in such a way as to create sustained and meaningful social change.

TRIPLE BOTTOM LINE
Consists of three Ps: profit, people and planet. It aims to measure the financial, social and environmental performance of the corporation over a period of time. Only a company that produces a TBL is taking account of the full cost involved in doing business.

VENTURE PHILANTHROPY
Philanthropic giving to social ventures that operate a business model and is generally associated with social start up or growth capital needed to deliver or grow a social mission. It generally, means the donator is not seeking anything other than a social return or community (non-private) benefit.

 

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